On the Prowl: Alternatives to White Marble Countertops

A friend of mine who is redoing her kitchen is obsessed with the look of white marble countertops.  But, considering how high maintenance they are (staining, chipping, and resealing every 3-4 months!), she wants to know if there are any alternatives to achieve the same look.  Sure, there are, I said, there are plenty of engineered stones and the like that look like marble.  WHERE? she demanded.  Where indeed?  So now I’m putting my statement to the test, to find out if there really is anything that can match the beauty of white marble.

alternative-white-marble-countertop

dupont-okite

silestone-lyra

quantro-carrara

4.   Quartzite in Luce di Luna, Super White, or Biancaquartzite that look like white marble PROS: Quartzite is a natural stone, very resilient, and stain-proof. As a natural stone, we get that great veiny look we’re searching for. The Bianca is the only material I found that imitates the Calacatta Gold’s warmer, beige veins rather than gray/black.
CONS: While the pictures I’ve chosen is fairly light, as a natural stone there will, of course, be variation in the coloring, so you might have to look around for a slab that is whitish rather than gray.  When I went to see the Luce di Luna in real life, I will say that I was disappointed by the darker appearance of the slab I saw.  If you’re going from one stoneyard to another looking for the right coloring, that can mean significant time shopping around.  Also, as a natural stone, quartzite can be superduper expensive… I’ve seen it quoted at $130+.

 

5.   White Granites: Bethel White, Casa Blanca and Beola Ghiandonatagranite-look-white-marble
PROS: We all know the pros of granites: hard, durable, and a magnet for future homebuyers.  The other upside is that granite’s popularity has lead to an abundant supply and some very, very affordable granite options… I’ve seen it quoted for as little as $29-49 sq ft installed.
CONS: Granite is just never white.  It can be light grey, but it will still be grey.  Period.  It is also not usually veiny.  It can be swirly, like the impossible to spell Beola Ghiandoata, but most of the time it will disappoint marble-seekers because it is typically dotty and splotchy. 

Beware: what suppliers are typically calling “white” granite probably looks something like this (an actual photo from a recent trip to a stoneyard):

white-graniteThis piece was priced at $40 sq ft.

6.   Caesarstone Misty Carrera:caesarstone-misty-carrera
PROS: Misty Carrera is 93% natural quartz, so it’s it’s stain, chip, and crack resistant, and extremely low maintenance.
CONS: I’ve seen this in real life, and I have to say that this is absolutely not white.  It is grey.  I’ve also heard rumors of a problem with the resin in Caesarstone that there was some yellowing after exposure to sunlight.  Unconfirmed, but scary nonetheless.

UPDATE: I didn’t get to all the products the first time! Please read on to see my second look at great substitutes for marble: Countertops that look like white marble (take two)

So what do you think? Which do you like the best?

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15 responses to “On the Prowl: Alternatives to White Marble Countertops

  1. Useful page and very enlightening. Thanks for taking the time to write it and post it!

  2. Oh my gosh this blog was so helpful! I am actually having a lot of trouble deciding between granite and marble countertops but now I have a lot of information to aid in my decision! Thank you

  3. Pingback: Countertops that look like white marble (Round 2) | roomology

  4. Very helpful information – thanks for putting it together. Do you know if the Okite, or the Cambria can have a honed finish, rather than polished? And, whether that is desirable, ie, easy to wipe clean, doesn’t stain, etc.?
    Thanks very much, Eve Prior 10 June 2011

  5. Thanks !am thinking silestone Lyra…would love the marble ,but i want a life! Any suggestions for contrasting colour for free standing benchtop back? Cheers sally 5/9/2012

  6. Thanks so much! My supplier and I have been looking for the right quartzite slab to put in my kitchen (in place of marble) for months, and have been unsuccessful. I am about ready to just go ahead and do marble, but no one wants me to. I am not wanting to settle for something I don’t want, and don’t like the manmade options at all. I appreciate you putting it all together in one place for me! so Helpful!

  7. This was very helpful, thank-you!
    I saw a slab of Newport white quartzite yesterday and it was gorgeous. I totally mistook it for Marble. Anyone ever seen this color?

  8. Another solution would be a new porcelain tile that is a digital image of actual marble. It is available in 5’x10′ sheets. You can see it on the following website: http://www.stonepeakceramics.com. The series is called “Plane”. Being porcelain, it is impervious and highly stain resistant. it would be fabricated by someone who also does granite or marble. Check out the StonePeak website for a supplier near you. It is truly amazing how realistic this product looks!

  9. What is option #2?

  10. Please do some more research before saying quartzite is stain-proof. There is a vast continuum of porosity – it CAN be hard and stain resistant like granite, but it can also be easily stained like marble. I just installed Luce di Luna by an unscrupulous stone dealer with all sorts of promises, and long story short, it is permanently stained. It is simply gorgeous, no doubt about it, but I’m sealing every few months now to prevent further damage.

  11. I am reaseaching this as well and found a quartz from QuartzMasters out of Bayonne,NJ that is the best I’ve seen yet as a marble alternative. Does anyone know about this ?

  12. Oops here is the correct email

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